TinYAP 022 — Dying, Death and Beyond, Time Manipulation, Returning to Life…

<WARNING: DO NOT TRY THIS AT HOME>
(or anywhere else, really)

Regarding death…

People may sometimes appear to die.  Even to themselves, a person may sometimes appear to be dead.

Nonetheless, all people always return to life after they have died.

Ordinarily, death can feel like a very brief experience, particularly in the sense that when you resume your life, very little time may appear to have passed between the moments before your death and the moments immediately after you awaken from your death, as you return to life.

Your experiences while you are dead do not require any time to pass in the living world. All of your experiences when you appear to have died run on a totally different clock; you have all the time in the ‘afterlife’ (or underworld) to return to your life. You will always return to your life as close in time and space as possible to where and when you left your life.

You have many lives; death can serve as a door to allow you to move from one incarnation to another. Of course, you cannot just leave your current body an empty shell.  Even if your body is momentarily dead, someone will hijack your corpse if you are away from it too long.

Fortunately, most people return to their dead bodies per the rules we have explained above.

All of your lives of your various incarnations and all of their iterations are lived by different internal clocks. All internal clocks expand timelessness into infinite time. Internal clocks can be may speed up or slow down subjective time so that time seems to go by either faster or slower. A slower clock divides time into smaller units between each tick, so that more ticks are experienced between one second and the next.

One way to imagine how a slower clock works is to think of a movie that is made with high-speed film. High speed film captures clear images when the subject is moving very quickly. There are a lot more frames per second with a high speed film. Played at an ordinary rate subjects in the film appear to move more slowly than usual. When your internal clock speeds up it adds ‘frames’ that represent briefer and briefer slices of time, because the intervals between ‘frames’ are briefer there appears to be more action in a short span of time.

When your internal clock removes frames to slow subjective time down, each remaining frame then represents a longer period of time. This is like shooting just a few frames a day to record the growth of a plant, then running the frames at a higher rate of speed to create an illusion of much more rapid growth. In this way, when your internal clock goes slower, time appears to pass more slowly because you experience a lower density of events over time that you may deem worthy of paying attention to.

On the other hand, when your clock is going much faster, time may seem to slow down to a crawl because you experience more significant events in a briefer amount of time.

Your clock speeds up when you need more processing power to pay greater attention to higher levels of detail and complexity. Fast clocks are excellent for creative people, athletes, or people facing a crisis where they feel certain they are in immediate physical danger.

Slower clocks are typical with people who are habitually bored; because they are not engaged with the world around themselves to any significant degree their clocks may allow them to relax and stand down, perhaps even catch a nap.

People whose clocks are nearly always running as fast as they can tolerate find it hard to make much time for sleep.

Time appears to expand or contract according to the degree to which the observer is actively and deeply engaged in their experiences. For instance, in dreams hours, days or months of subjective time may pass by in only a few brief minutes of sleep.

We cannot say how many times this flexibility of our own internal clocks appear to have saved our lives.

For instance, on one occasion when we fell from a scaffold from three stories up, our subjective time immediately snapped into extreme slow motion, meaning our internal clock was running very fast. While falling we had plenty of time to look around. We drifted towards the ground below as slowly as a feather falls. We had time to calculate that we had just one opportunity to save ourselves from serious injury. We were able to hook one leg around the last horizontal bar of scaffolding before the ground, and then catch ourselves by locking our heels together. We wound up dangling upside down with all of our spare change flying out of our pockets. We could almost reach the ground if we stretched our arms out as far as we could.

On another occasion we went into subjective slow motion after being hit by a car. The car hit us from behind while we were riding our bicycle, throwing us over the handlebars. we had plenty of time to think about what we were doing, to tuck and roll, taking the impact with the ground on our shoulders. We could then look up in time to snag our flying bicycle out of the air by the handlebars and wrench it across the curb onto the grass margin between the sidewalk and the street. We used the momentum of the bicycle to help us to roll over the curb with our bike just in time to avoid being run over by the car that hit us which was traveling at nearly 50 miles an hour. We were well within an established bicycle lane on a road marked for only 25 miles an hour, approaching a school zone.

This flexibility of internal clocks is a great survival tool.

Often, when we die, we are retroactively saved from what had been certain death by a heroic form of ourselves who takes control of our mind and body and knows exactly how to manage our internal clock and body far better than we can.

If we examine the bicycle incident closely, we see we may really have died then. We do not remember dying then, but most of our memories of our deaths are pretty spotty. It seems as if people are just not supposed to remember their deaths.

In ancient lore, people who die must cross two rivers in the Underworld, Styx (death) and Lethe (memory removal). Memory removal usually assures that most ‘afterlife’ experiences, including the moment of death, are entirely forgotten.

We believe the only reason we remember as much as we do, including our memories that go back to our mothers’ wombs and beyond, may be due to our very early childhood training.

For glimpses into our childhood and what may be considered to be our very unusual training please see our page titled A CHILD’S TALES.

We can clearly remember several deaths in this lifetime.  One time, a friend cut our throat deeply from ear to ear in a ritual to prove to us that we are immortal.  Two witnesses were stunned and discussed choosing to forget what they had seen.  Another time we were shot dead by the police while trying to steal their van,  We touched each police officer in the back of his head near the nape of his neck with the fingers of either hand of our astral body simultaneously.  Our corpse immediately vanished, while our astral body turned to flesh.

Once again, the witnesses were stunned and discussed choosing to forget what they had seen. 

In both cases, the witnesses promptly forgot what had happened.

Most people appear to have a very low tolerance for anything they may prefer to believe is impossible; denial is most often their best refuge from events they have witnessed that might drive them mad if they choose to remember…

We do sound mad?  Yes?

Of course, we assure you we are not at all mad, however you may possibly take a long time to remember enough times when you have died in your current incarnation to begin to believe our assertions.  However, according to some of our friends, eventually you will come to agree with us, if not before you die again, then sometime after you have died many more times.

<WARNING>  We strongly recommend that you do not kill yourselves to test our assertions.

The safest way to understand your own immortality is to choose to remember times in this lifetime when you have already died.  We already know that you have died many times already, so this should not be too hard to learn to do if you really wish to know for yourself that what we have explained to you may really be true.

It’s like our mom says, “if you want to prove you can fly, be sure to do it from the ground up”.

How do we know you have died many times already?

Death is written into the fabric of every person’s lives; no matter how you divide up time, you are always being killed, and the universe you live in is always disappearing with you as you die.

This is a function of how creation works, but then so is the ‘big bang’.  If you think creationism and science cannot be reconciled, we would like to suggest you read: The Great False Debate, Science vs. Religion

Once you have died, you may have several options.  In one option you will always return to the life you have just departed from, and you then resume your life wherever you left off.  No matter how much time you spend with your other options, your previous life will always be waiting for you to return to it and resume it.

Another option is to try a different incarnation.  You can enter any of your other incarnations, even a ‘new’ one at any time.  If a part of you is currently living that lifetime they may agree to swap with you. 

Please note, in some circumstances, swapping your consciousness with someone in another incarnation including another of your own incarnations may occur for brief spans of time, following which you may return to whichever incarnation you were previously living in.

Yet another option is to spend some time, as many eternities as you like, really, remaining in the ‘afterlife’ or underworld, in order to get to know what reality is like from the other side, as it were… The afterlife can be lots of fun, you may meet all sorts of people you love, and may be free to have as many adventures as you like.  The downside to such sojourns in these ‘afterlife’ experiences is that you must cross the River Lethe to return to life, and are therefor, on exiting, you may most likely forget all of your ‘afterlife’ experiences, whenever you have return to life.

Regardless of your choices, (and, you are always free to choose all of them simultaneously), after you have died some of yourselves will always return to the whichever lives you have ‘recently’ died in and resume them.

As impossible as this may seem, this is not some paradox, this is just how things really are.

Enjoy!

PS
If you enjoyed this blog you should really like the Robin Williams movie titled:
What Dreams May Come, or one of our favorite articles,
‘Hell in a Nutshell’.

PPS
We owe you explanations of why the corpses of people you know who have died do not seem to return to life, and the ways you may harm yourselves by suicide without successfully escaping from whatever torment drove you to kill yourselves.  That will come another time, we can’t quite remember where we have made that explanation before or we would link it here now…

Bye, bye fer now, and remember, Enjoy!

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