TinYAP 023 — Beyond Death and Dying

(explanations promised at the end of TinYAP 022)

In TinYAP 022 we described what happens when people die. We (the authors) understand death intimately from our personal experiences because we have died many, many times, both in various versions of this current incarnation (versions we call ‘iterations’), as well as times when we have died in some of our other incarnations.

In TY022 We briefly explained, in context to ancient Greek beliefs, why people returning to life forget their ‘afterlife’ experiences.  While we should explain this better in another context using more modern terms, we will leave such explanations for another post and explain instead focus on the previously promised explanations of why the corpses of people you know who have died do not seem to return to life, and the ways you may unintentionally harm yourselves by suicide without successfully escaping from whatever torments drove you to kill yourselves,

Please note – we put quotes around the word ‘afterlife’ because time is very different from what most people appear to believe about it. Past and future are always simultaneous with the present. We understand this may seem impossible or confusing to you, however, this is yet another explanation we may owe you which we will have to make later.
Also,
in TY022 we advised readers not to test our assertions regarding dying or death with suicide.  It only now occurs to us that perhaps we should also have advised our readers not to test our assertions by killing anyone else, as well.

Every suicide’s death remains a ‘real’ death in the sense that their death may leave a corpse behind in the universes they ‘cast off’ when they kill themselves.  Also, someone who has died by any other means than suicide may also leave a corpse behind.

In those universes where a suicide returns to life they do not appear to have died.  The suicide returns to life in more or less the same state as they existed in before their suicide.  Alas, their suicides inform their universes that they are very unhappy with what they have, so they tend to lose most of what they had before they killed themselves, unless they have guardians or custodians who may help them to keep their belongings and maintain their relationships.

A billionaire who kills themselves may return to life and become a pauper in just a few days.

Someone with many close friends and family may lose less of their material wealth if they kill themselves, because their friends and family may sometimes act as guardians or custodians to help preserve their property.  However, suicides also often ruin their closest relationships.

The deaths of suicides in particular, may ruin relationships, however any death, in general, may also damage or ruin close relationships.

Every time you die the people whom love you most are hurt.  The more frequently you *choose* to die, the more deeply members of your family or friends may be hurt.

Everyone dies countless unremembered deaths, but the deaths of suicides leave much deeper impressions on people, impressions that are rarely understood but which serve to alienate people.  In whatever universes where a suicide finds themselves when they return to life, those people who are emotionally closest to them may become more alienated from them even though their family or friends are unlikely to be consciously aware that their loved one has killed themselves in an alternate universe.

Even though suicides return to their lives and carry on as if they had not died, suicides also leave behind worlds in alternate universes in which they no are no longer incarnate beings; worlds in which their lovers, families, friends and other associates may have been deeply hurt by the deaths of someone they loved who killed themselves.

When someone kills themselves they leave a corpse in one universe and return to life in another universe in a new body.  Their new body is virtually indistinguishable from the body they killed.

Nothing seems to have changed for the suicide or the people they know, however, in the universes where the suicide dies the people who mourn their loss are in pain, and that pain can carry over from one universe to another.

People close to a resurrected suicide feel their own pain bleeding over from those universes where the suicide has died into those universes where the suicide is still alive.  That transferred pain may insidiously alienate them from the person they love who has abandoned them in another universe by killing themselves.

People living with a loved one in universes where the loved one has returned from suicide may be unaware of their loved one’s suicide on any conscious level, however they may still feel some of the pain they are experiencing from those universes where their loved one has died by killing themselves.

Such people intuitively understand the pain they feel is related to the person they love who has killed themselves in an alternate universe.  This pain that has been transferred to them from another of themselves in another universe causes them to reflexively withdraw from their suicidal loved one.

A suicidal person can feel the withdrawal of their loved ones and this often increases their desire to kill themselves again.

Most suicides do not kill themselves only once; many suicides kill themselves repeatedly, injuring many of their closest relationships over, and over again.

It can be very difficult for suicidal people trapped in negative feedback loops to learn to motivate themselves to remain alive and to get on with their lives in a healthier manner.

Meanwhile, once a person has decided to kill themselves, it becomes easier to decide to kill themselves again, so not only is their motivation to kill themselves increased by the withdrawal of their closest relationships, but at the same time they are breaking down their inhibitions or reservations against killing themselves.  Consequently, suicidal people become prone to killing themselves more and more frequently.

This feedback loop actually increases the pain a suicidal person is feeling.  The suicidal person then makes themselves suffer more than they would if they had not killed themselves.

These are the reasons why we *strongly* advise people not to kill themselves.

It is impossible to escape pain or suffering by suicide, you can only make things worse for yourselves by killing yourselves.

We know this from our own personal experiences, having killed ourselves many, many times.

It’s bad enough we must die many times for reasons that may seem accidental, or for reasons that may be more homicidal than accidental, however, we should not need to add more to our pain by killing ourselves as well.

Dying hurts.

Each time we are dying we feel the people who love us most calling out to us, beseeching us to return, begging us not to leave them.  We feel all of their pain and the suffering they cause themselves when they grieve for us or mourn their loss.

The emotional pains of dying are far worse than any mere physical discomfort.  The emotional pains are so severe that they may sometimes help many suicidal people to change their minds about killing themselves.

However, those suicidal people who fail to change their minds may still go on to kill themselves.  Many of those who succeed in killing themselves may go on to kill themselves repeatedly until they become so numb to their own pain that they no longer care if they live or die and may then cease to kill themselves any more, not out of a will or desire to live, but out of apathy.

We ourselves have killed ourselves countless times, in every age of this incarnation, from womb to present.  We have left many graves in many worlds, we have abandoned many mourners who have grieved for us or who have suffered in the wakes of our passings.

Sometimes we find death useful.

Sometimes death can be a tool with which we may work on parts of ourselves that are difficult to change while we are alive.

Many aspects of peoples’ minds are in feedback relationships with their bodies or with other people.  Each person has many homeostatic regulatory systems which help to maintain not only their physical or spiritual health, but also their emotional and cognitive health, as well as the health of their relationships with other people.

Such homeostatic processes must be suspended to make particular changes to how various parts of our minds or bodies function.

Death is one means of suspending such homeostatic processes.  We do not happen to know of another, however, we strongly suspect that other methods exist.

<<<INTERRUPT>>> Other methods do exist.  A person who is an integrated member of a spiritual community may receive assistance with anything requiring homeostatic suspension through whatever prayers, meditations, or rituals are the conventional tools of their culture.
You have difficulty remembering this sort of thing because of your severe alienation.
<<<PROCEEED>>>

Thank you Interruptor.

Anyways…
As is often the case, this leads us to yet another story that may be more appropriate in a separate post.

We believe we have sufficiently covered both points we initially set out to explain.

Laters, then, fer now…

Enjoy!

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